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Project TitleRotation-Sensitive Semiconductor Ring Laser Device Using the Nonlinear Sagnac Effect
Track Code2011-095
Short Description

University of New Mexico researchers and their colleagues have developed a novel method of increasing sensitivity in ring laser devices.

Abstract

This method relies on the Non-Linear Sagnac Effect (NLSE) and maintains ring size. With this method, the sensitivity slope has an approximate increase of 100-1000 over current methods.

 
TagsGyroscopes, homeland security, semiconductor lasers, satellite navigation
 
Posted DateJan 25, 2012 5:22 PM

Researcher

Name
Marek Osinski
Petr Eliseev
Edward Taylor

Manager

Name
Briana Wobbe

Background

Inertial navigation systems measure the angular velocity of an object to determine its position, orientation, and velocity as well as any change in these parameters. These systems do not rely on any external reference points and are being used in submarines, aircraft, and missiles. The sensing component of these navigation systems are the ring laser gyroscopes. These gyroscopes currently rely on the Sagnac effect which describes interference patterns in light waves. The sensitivity of these devices is defined by the derivative of the mode beating frequency with respect to the angular rotation rate. To increase sensitivity of these gyroscopes, previous methods have increased the beating frequency by reducing the ratio of ring area to perimeter length. While this has led to increased sensitivity, current technological limitations prevent large improvements. Another method of increasing sensitivity is needed.

Technology Description

University of New Mexico researchers and their colleagues have developed a novel method of increasing sensitivity in ring laser devices. This method relies on the Non-Linear Sagnac Effect (NLSE) and maintains ring size. With this method, the sensitivity slope has an approximate increase of 100-1000 over current methods.

Advantages/Applications

  • Enhances sensitivity
  • Maintains ring size
  • Significantly decreases chip size
  • Applications in homeland security, navigation systems, and semiconductor devices

INQUIRES

STC has filed intellectual property on this exciting new technology and is currently exploring commercialization options. If you are interested in information about this or other technologies, please contact Arlene Mirabal at amirabal@stc.unm.edu or 505-272-7886.

Files

File Name Description
9,354,062 Issued Patent None Download

Intellectual Property

Patent Number Issue Date Type Country of Filing
9,354,062 May 31, 2016 Utility United States