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Project TitleDislocation Blocking and Subsequent Selective Growth to Achieve Low-Dislocation-Density Heteroepitaxial Films on Lattice-Mismatched Substrates
Track Code2011-048
Short Description

A novel method by which one can terminate dislocations in crystalline films heteroepitaxially grown on lattice-mismatched substrates and prevent these dislocations from propagating into subsequently grown films. 

Abstract

Threading dislocations in heteroepitaxial films often propagate to the film surface. The film etch rate in a chemical etchant is typically more pronounced where the dislocations terminate than surrounding areas, thus leaving etch pits. These etch pits can be filled with a dielectric material to block the dislocations from propagating further. After the etch pits are filled, one can manipulate the surface chemistry to continue to grow the same film or a different heteroepitaxial film selectively on top of the exposed film surface over the dielectric surface. This selective growth eliminates random nucleation on the dielectric surface and prevents polycrystallinity in the subsequently grown films.

 
Tagsoptoelectronics, photovoltaic, Semiconductor Fabrication
 
Posted DateJul 18, 2011 10:50 AM

Researcher

Name
Sang Han
Darin Leonhardt

Manager

Name
Briana Wobbe

Background

Electronic and photonic devices often have a need for heteroepitaxial films.  Dislocations are crystallographic defects, or irregularities, within a crystal structure.  Dislocations in heteroepitaxial films can be caused by strain in lattice mismatch. A method for reducing or all together terminating the effects of these dislocations can improve the quality and function of heteroepitaxial films and their uses.

Technology Description

University of New Mexico researchers have developed a novel method by which one can terminate dislocations in crystalline films heteroepitaxially grown on lattice-mismatched substrates and prevent these dislocations from propagating into subsequently grown films.  Threading dislocations in heteroepitaxial films often propagate to the film surface.  The film etch rate in a chemical etchant is typically more pronounced where the dislocations terminate than surrounding areas, thus leaving etch pits.  These etch pits can be filled with a dielectric material to block the dislocations from propagating further.  After the etch pits are filled, one can manipulate the surface chemistry to continue to grow the same film or a different heteroepitaxial film selectively on top of the exposed film surface over the dielectric surface.  This selective growth eliminates random nucleation on the dielectric surface and prevents polycrystallinity in the subsequently grown films.

Advantages

  • Terminates dislocations in crystalline films
  • Eliminates random nucleation on the dielectric surface
  • Prevents polycrystallinity in subsequently grown films
  • Achieves low-dislocation-density heteroepitaxial films

Applications/Markets

  • Low-cost photovoltaics
  • Optoelectronics
  • Semiconductor fabrication
  • Photonic devices

Publication(s)

INQUIRES

STC has filed intellectual property on this exciting new technology and is currently exploring commercialization options. If you are interested in information about this or other technologies, please contact Arlene Mirabal at amirabal@stc.unm.edu or 505-272-7886.

Files

File Name Description
9,269,569 Issued Patent None Download

Intellectual Property

Patent Number Issue Date Type Country of Filing
9,269,569 Feb 23, 2016 Utility United States