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Project TitleMultifunctional Nanoparticles for Enhanced Drug Delivery to the Lung
Track Code2008-042
Short Description

This novel technology involves the use of active multifunctional nanoparticles specifically designed to overcome barriers in the delivery of therapeutics to the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis, COPD, and other lung diseases.

Abstract

This novel technology involves the use of active multifunctional nanoparticles specifically designed to overcome barriers in the delivery of therapeutics to the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis, COPD, and other lung diseases. The technology utilizes nanoparticle systems that have already obtained FDA approval for other applications. The transport of drugs within the airways is improved using this technology. These drugs (existing therapies, or NCEs), can be directly associated with the nanoparticle system or administered separately. Additionally, Dr. Hugh Smyth was awarded a grant from the National Institute of Health's National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute to continue the research. He will be approximately awarded $2.1 million over the next four years.

 
Tagscystic fibrosis, drug delivery, inhaler, pulmonary
 
Posted DateJan 24, 2011 11:34 AM

Researcher

Name
Hugh Smyth
Marek Osinski
Shayna McGill

Manager

Name
Jovan Heusser

Background

More than 35 million Americans have chronic lung diseases such as tuberculosis (TB), Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD), cystic fibrosis (CF), and lung cancer. Lung diseases such as these are the number three killer in the United States responsible for 1 in 7 deaths every year. These diseases are so devastating and lethal because biological barriers produced within the patients’ bodies make the diseases very difficult to treat.

Over the past 30 years there has been significant improvement for many lung diseases due in part to inhalation aerosols for drug delivery. However, the effectiveness of inhaled therapies is significantly reduced when biological barriers such as mucus, biogel, and biofilm are present. When gene and therapeutic treatments are administered in the presence of biological barriers, the drugs are often incapable of quickly penetrating and diffusing across the barriers to the target cells. Due to this inefficiency, therapeutics often degrade or metabolize before they are active, which ultimately results in ineffective treatments.

Enhancing the transport of genes and drugs is now realized as a critical step for improving therapy for lung diseases. For the delivery of genes and therapeutics to be effective, the barriers covering the target cells must be overcome. With our current technology, the facilitation of nanoparticles with therapeutic and gene agents may allow greater efficiency of treatments for patients with lung diseases due to enhanced penetration and diffusion through mucus and other barriers.

Technology Description

This novel technology involves the use of active multifunctional nanoparticles specifically designed to overcome barriers in the delivery of therapeutics to the airways of patients with cystic fibrosis, COPD, and other lung diseases. The technology utilizes nanoparticle systems that have already obtained FDA approval for other applications. The transport of drugs within the airways is improved using this technology. These drugs (existing therapies, or NCEs), can be directly associated with the nanoparticle system or administered separately.

Additionally, Dr. Hugh Smyth was awarded a grant from the National Institute of Health's National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute to continue the research. He will be approximately awarded $2.1 million over the next four years.

Advantages/Applications

  • Enhanced penetration of drugs through biological barriers
  • Improved diffusion through mucus
  • Quicker transport rates of therapeutics
  • High drug concentrations on site of action
  • Improved targeting within the airways

Publications

INQUIRES

STC has filed intellectual property on this exciting new technology and is currently exploring commercialization options. If you are interested in information about this or other technologies, please contact Arlene Mirabal at amirabal@stc.unm.edu or 505-272-7886.

Files

File Name Description
9,186,317 Issued Patent None Download

Intellectual Property

Patent Number Issue Date Type Country of Filing
9,186,317 Nov 17, 2015 Utility United States