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Project TitleNanofluidics for Bioseparation and Analysis
Track Code2005-001
Short Description

Nanostructured separation matrices used to separate protein molecules.

Abstract

The microchannel device separates and focuses charged proteins based on electric field gradient focusing. The device does not use exotic materials such as antibodies or synthetic ampholytes, but operates by physical means involving manipulation of electrophoretic and electroosmotic velocities. An important difference between this novel invention and PAGE is the injection of current at discrete intersections of the channel rather than continuously along the length of a separation channel. Significantly, the devices can be manufactured into networks of nanochannel devices that are integrated with detection systems which permits evaluation of the purity of biomolecules at various stages of the purification or analytical procedure.

 
Tagsproteins, protein separation, diagnostics, diagnostic
 
Posted DateJun 14, 2013

Researcher

Name
Sang Han
Gabriel Lopez
Steven Brueck
Cornelius Ivory
Dimiter Petsev

Manager

Name
Briana Wobbe

Background

Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) remains the standard for protein separation and identification. Although PAGE techniques are recognized to have good resolution and dynamic range, the separation strategies that rely on this technique are hampered by (1) inconvenience and irreproducibility in preparation of the variety of gels needed for the separations, (2) limited resolution and dynamic range of biomolecular separations, (3) susceptibility of the polymer to degradation under high electric fields, (4) limitations in their compatibility with mass spectrometric identification of proteins, and (5) relatively large volumes and concentrations of material needed for detection of separated species. There is a current need for a new method and/or device for separating and analyzing biomolecules more efficiently.

Technology Description

Researchers at the University of New Mexico have invented nanostructured separation matrices used to separate protein molecules. The microchannel device separates and focuses charged proteins based on electric field gradient focusing. The device does not use exotic materials such as antibodies or synthetic ampholytes, but operates by physical means involving manipulation of electrophoretic and electroosmotic velocities. An important difference between this novel invention and PAGE is the injection of current at discrete intersections of the channel rather than continuously along the length of a separation channel. Significantly, the devices can be manufactured into networks of nanochannel devices that are integrated with detection systems which permits evaluation of the purity of biomolecules at various stages of the purification or analytical procedure.

Advantages/Applications

Benefits include:

  • More convenient than gel methods for separation
  • Reproducibility, improved resolution and dynamic range
  • Less susceptibility to polymer degradation under high electric fields
  • More compatible with mass spectrometric identification of proteins
  • Lower volumes and concentrations of material needed for detection of separated species
  • Can be comprised of a single nanochannel or a network of multiple nanochannels

Applications Include:

  • Food and nutritional products
  • Pharmaceutical products
  • Industrial catalysts
  • Diagnostic products
  • Proteins used for miscellaneous applications

Publications

Electrostatic Potential and Electroosmotic Flow in a Cylindrical Capillary Filled with Symmetric Electrolyte: Analytic Solutions in Thin Double Layer Approximation. Petsev, D., Lopez, G.P., J. Coll. Interface Sci., 2006, vol. 294, no. 2, pp. 492-498.

Microchannel protein separation by field gradient focusing. D. N. Petsev, G. P. Lopez, C. F. Ivory and Scott Sibbett, Lab on Chip, 2005, vol. 5, pp. 587-597.

Microchip countercurrent electroseparation. Ista, L. K., Lopez, G. P., Ivory, C. F., Ortiz, M. J., Schifani, T. A., Schwappach, C. D., Sibbett, S. S., Lab on a Chip, 2203, vol. 3, pp. 266-272.

INQUIRES

STC has filed intellectual property on this exciting new technology and is currently exploring commercialization options. If you are interested in information about this or other technologies, please contact Arlene Mirabal at amirabal@stc.unm.edu or 505-272-7886.

Files

File Name Description
8,105,471 Issued Patent None Download

Intellectual Property

Patent Number Issue Date Type Country of Filing
8,105,471 None Utility United States