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Project TitleProtocells for Spinal Cord Non-viral Gene Therapy to Control Neuropathic Pain
Track Code2010-026
Short Description

This technology describes various methods and techniques for developing nanoparticle silica-based liposome vectors (nanoSLV), otherwise referred to as protocells. 

Abstract

This technology describes various methods and techniques for developing nanoparticle silica-based liposome vectors (nanoSLV), otherwise referred to as protocells. See the related technology: 2009-054. The protocells can be loaded with desired cargos (chemical, protein-therapeutics, DNA, siRNA etc), and the lipid bilayer component of protocells modified with cellular or organ specific molecules (peptides, antibodies, receptors etc) to achieve discrete drug targeting. The nanoSLV can serve as transgene vectors for targeted spinal gene transfer to effectively treat longer duration neuropathic pain. Further, when spinal cord gene transfer is performed using other compatible polymers, a co-injection with nano-SLV significantly enhances gene transfer by stimulating local cells in the spinal tissue milieu resulting in increased gene uptake. Exemplary and detailed chemical methods to make highly tunable protocells for controlled release and enhanced cargo delivery, using silane precursors and positively, negatively and zwittor ionic liposome formulation, were also depicted.

 
Tagsdrug delivery, pain, spinal cord injury
 
Posted DateApr 5, 2013

Researcher

Name
Erin Milligan
C. Brinker
Juewen Liu

Manager

Name
Jovan Heusser

Background

Chronic neuropathic pain is a common unsolved health problem. Animal studies have shown that pathological pain signaling is often a consequence of pro-inflammatory cytokines released from activated glial and innate immune cells in spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia. The anti-inflammatory cytokines are powerful natural counter-regulators of pro-inflammatory cytokine-mediated pain. Injection of certain naked plasmid DNA in animal models is effective for long-duration pain relief that lasts longer than 3 months. However, a significant amount of (2.85 milligram peri-spinal DNA) of this naked plasmid DNA is required to achieve therapeutic efficacy, thereby limiting its practical use in future human clinical trials. So the need for robust, non-viral gene-therapy for persistent pain relief is pressing.

Technology Description

This technology describes various methods and techniques for developing nanoparticle silica-based liposome vectors (nanoSLV), otherwise referred to as protocells. See the related technology: 2009-054. The protocells can be loaded with desired cargos (chemical, protein-therapeutics, DNA, siRNA etc), and the lipid bilayer component of protocells modified with cellular or organ specific molecules (peptides, antibodies, receptors etc) to achieve discrete drug targeting. The nanoSLV can serve as transgene vectors for targeted spinal gene transfer to effectively treat longer duration neuropathic pain. Further, when spinal cord gene transfer is performed using other compatible polymers, a co-injection with nano-SLV significantly enhances gene transfer by stimulating local cells in the spinal tissue milieu resulting in increased gene uptake. Exemplary and detailed chemical methods to make highly tunable protocells for controlled release and enhanced cargo delivery, using silane precursors and positively, negatively and zwittor ionic liposome formulation, were also depicted.

Advantages/Applications

  • Single NanoSLV injection can significantly improve gene transfer for long-duration neuropathic pain relief
  • NanoSLV can stimulate subarachnoid local cells (immune cells) to optimize therapeutics targeted to the spinal cord tissues
  • Highly amenable to use with other biologically compatible polymer-based treatments
  • Highly tunable protocells for controlled release and enhanced pain-relief therapeutics to spinal cord
  • Cost effective method as single injection can bring pain-relief for longer duration

INQUIRES

STC has filed intellectual property on this exciting new technology and is currently exploring commercialization options. If you are interested in information about this or other technologies, please contact Arlene Mirabal at amirabal@stc.unm.edu or 505-272-7886.