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Project TitleNew Method of Modulation Spectroscopy for Measurements of Changes in Excited State Lifetime
Track Code2001-002
Short Description

This invention is for a new method of fluorescence lifetime-based chemical/biological sensor monitoring called frequency fluorimetry.

Abstract

This invention is for a new method of fluorescence lifetime-based chemical/biological sensor monitoring called frequency fluorimetry. This technique doesnt require external signal synthesizers and/or the cross correlation detection technique in order to obtain high precision measurements, making it a much less expensive alternative to existing lifetime-based instruments. The detection platform consists of an optoelectronic circuit which exhibits self-oscillations with frequencies in the neighborhood of the inverse of the fluorescence lifetime. Changes in the fluorescence lifetime optically alter the resonance characteristics of the circuit. This, in turn, causes a frequency shift in the self-oscillations which can be measured very precisely with a frequency counter.

 
Tagsoptoelectronics
 
Posted DateJan 12, 2011 12:52 PM

Researcher

Name
Emmanuel Rabinovich
Gabriel Lopez
Michael O'Brien

Manager

Name
Briana Wobbe

Background

The phasefluorimetry method of lifetime sensing has several attractive features such as high sensitivity, high level of noise discrimination, the capability to use well-developed and easily accessible light modulation techniques, and a relative insensitivity to fluorophore bleaching and excitation light fluctuations. However, the phasefluorimetry method remains relatively expensive and complicated due to the necessity of precision digital electronic elements (such as frequency synthesizers) to obtain high quality phase measurements.

Technology Description

This invention is for a new method of fluorescence lifetime-based chemical/biological sensor monitoring called frequency fluorimetry. This technique doesn’t require external signal synthesizers and/or the cross correlation detection technique in order to obtain high precision measurements, making it a much less expensive alternative to existing lifetime-based instruments. The detection platform consists of an optoelectronic circuit which exhibits self-oscillations with frequencies in the neighborhood of the inverse of the fluorescence lifetime. Changes in the fluorescence lifetime optically alter the resonance characteristics of the circuit. This, in turn, causes a frequency shift in the self-oscillations which can be measured very precisely with a frequency counter.

Advantages/Applications

Fluorescence lifetime-based chemical and biological sensors are good candidates to satisfy the detection needs for different applications including medical, pharmaceutical, environmental, and military biochemical warfare detection.

This system provides lifetime-based measurements with inexpensive, off-the-shelf components. Because the resonance frequencies of many fluorophores are in the neighborhood of 40 to 50 MHz, systems may be designed and constructed using low cost electronic components from the cellular phone industry. The design is scalable, so the basic optoelectronic circuit maybe duplicated many times in order to provide for sensor array monitoring. The system is fast because the response of the resonance frequency to lifetime changes is almost instantaneous. Limitations on the time constants of the sensor platform are determined by the frequency counter. For example, using an inexpensive computer-based frequency counter (which may monitor 1 to 64 channels simultaneously), time constants obtained are as short as one second.

Publications

INQUIRES

STC has filed intellectual property on this exciting new technology and is currently exploring commercialization options. If you are interested in information about this or other technologies, please contact Arlene Mirabal at amirabal@stc.unm.edu or 505-272-7886.

Files

File Name Description
2001-002 Issued Patent US6673626.pdf None Download

Intellectual Property

Patent Number Issue Date Type Country of Filing
6,673,626 Jan 6, 2004 Utility United States