Go to Top
INVENTOR LOGIN

Details

Project TitleNovel Small Molecule Treatment for Hemorrhagic Stroke
Track Code2017-028
Short Description

Researchers at the University of New Mexico have been studying mechanisms of brain damage in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH)/hemorrhagic stroke (HS) and have some important discoveries regarding the molecular process of ICH/HS-induced brain injury.

Abstract

Identification of novel small molecules to prevent brain tissue damage. These molecules show benefits using both in vitro and in vivo ICH/HS models offering a new potential approach for reducing brain damage. 

 
Tagsstroke, brain injury, hemorrhagic stroke
 
Posted DateFeb 8, 2017 3:55 PM

Researcher

Name
Graham Timmins
Ke Jian Liu
Rong Pan

Manager

Name
Jovan Heusser

Background

Stroke is a leading cause of death and adult disability in the world. The second most prevalent type of stroke, known both as intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and hemorrhagic stroke (HS) has the poorest prognosis of all stroke subtypes and is responsible for about 40 percent of all stroke deaths.  However, there are currently no drugs available to treat ICH, as the mechanisms behind the brain damage caused by ICH have been only partially understood.

Technology Description

Researchers at the University of New Mexico have been studying mechanisms of brain damage in ICH/HS and have some important discoveries regarding the molecular process of ICH/HS-induced brain injury. Consequently, they have identified novel small molecules to prevent brain tissue damage. These molecules show benefits using both in vitro and in vivo ICH/HS models offering a new potential approach for reducing brain damage. 

Advantages/Applications

New potential target for reducing brain damage following intracerebral hemorrhage.

INQUIRES

STC has filed intellectual property on this exciting new technology and is currently exploring commercialization options. If you are interested in information about this or other technologies, please contact Arlene Mirabal at amirabal@stc.unm.edu or 505-272-7886.