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Project TitleMethod for Sensitivity Optimization of Optical Receivers Using Avalanche Photodiodes Operating Under a Dynamic Reverse Bias
Track Code2013-110
Short Description

A method for sensitivity optimization using avalanche photodiodes (APDs) with dynamic biasing.

Abstract

Unlike most receivers that induce optical pre-amplification that have sufficient bandwidth to support 10-Gbps transmission, APDs may be suitable for digital 25-Gbps fiber optic communication links and beyond, which acts as a perfect fit to digital communications and data communications. Using a dynamic-biased-enhanced APD (DBE-APD) approach has been shown to significantly increase the gain-bandwidth product of an APD compared to the same APD which operates under the conventional static biasing scheme.

 
TagsOptoelectronic Devices, communications, fiber optic communications
 
Posted DateMar 28, 2016 12:08 PM

Researcher

Name
Majeed Hayat
Payman Zarkesh-Ha
Georges El-Howayek

Manager

Name
Melissa Castillo

Background

There is currently a drastic increase in demand/growth in video, voice, data, and mobile-device traffic over the Internet. In order to meet these growing demands, the telecommunication and data-communication industry has begun working towards using greater Gbps (giga bits per second) data rates, in the 100G Ethernet and its upcoming 400-G extension, emerging Gigabit Passive Optical Networks (GPON), data-communication in support of data centers, as well as any high-speed optical communication for which power is a limitation. Most of these systems operate at the low-loss optical wavelength windows around 1.55μm, and 1.55μm in conjunction with dense-wavelength-division-multiplexing to have better utilization of the optical signal carrier. Many of the modulation techniques that are effective at high speeds require receivers that are based upon the direct detection of optical pulses. Typically, high-speed operations use high sensitivity detectors, devices that convert optical pulse to electrical pulses and requiring very little optical receiver in the incoming optical-pulse signals. A commonly used photodetector in high-speed optical communication is the avalanche photodiode (APD). These are highly desirable, cost-effective detectors due to their simple structures and good sensitivity to weak optical signals. However, problems with APDs exist in the fact that InP (indium phosphide) and other semiconductor materials which APDs utilize to provide good sensitivity, have a long avalanche buildup time (which is the time needed for all the impact ionizations to settle, thereby resulting in long tails after the optical pulses vanish). This ultimately limits the speed of APDs and stops them from meeting the expectations of 100-G and upcoming 400-G systems, which require APDs operating at speeds of 25 Gbps per channel (for example, 4 channels, each with a slightly different wavelength around 1.55μm, is used in 100-G Ethernet), and even at 50 Gbps. Alternative solutions to APDs are expensive and bulky, requiring solid-state optical amplification, equalization, etc. There are presently no commercially available 25G APDs for telecom and datacom using the 1.55μm and 1.3μm wavelengths. The goal is to develop25 Gbps APDs and beyond that can be deployed in existing 100-G and upcoming 400-G systems.

Technology Description

Researchers at the University of New Mexico have designed a method for sensitivity optimization using avalanche photodiodes (APDs) with dynamic biasing. Unlike most receivers that induce optical pre-amplification that have sufficient bandwidth to support 10-Gbps transmission, APDs may be suitable for digital 25-Gbps fiber optic communication links and beyond, which acts as a perfect fit to digital communications and data communications. Using a dynamic-biased-enhanced APD (DBE-APD) approach has been shown to significantly increase the gain-bandwidth product of an APD compared to the same APD which operates under the conventional static biasing scheme.

Advantages/Applications

  • Dynamic-biasing approach of APDs for elevating and optimizing the performance of APDs in high-speed optical communication
  • Can be easily integrated with the electronic components of the receiver circuit
  • Greater gain-bandwidth-product (GBP) may be achieved
  • Minimizes the total number of multiplications, reducing afterpulsing in single-photon detection systems used in quantum communications
  • Detector in its mode as a high-gain, short-build up time APD may be considered to be similar to silicon or mercury-cadmium-telluride APDs albeit for detection of optical wavelengths of 1.3μm and 1.55μm
  • Applications in optoelectronic devices
  • Applications in 100-G and 400-G Ethernet, GPON, datacenters, etc.

INQUIRES

STC has filed intellectual property on this exciting new technology and is currently exploring commercialization options. If you are interested in information about this or other technologies, please contact Arlene Mirabal at amirabal@stc.unm.edu or 505-272-7886.