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Project TitleLanthanide-Halide Core/Shell Scintillator Materials
Track Code2008-093
Short Description

This novel nanocrystal scintillator technology offers significantly improved performance applicable to range of industries.

Abstract

This novel nanocrystal scintillator technology offers significantly improved performance applicable to range of industries. Colloidal nanocrystals have attracted tremendous interest over the last few years for a wide range of applications. So far, their potential has largely eluded the nuclear detection community. Compared to currently used scintillating particles of the micrometer size, nanocrystals offer the prospect of significantly improved performance. Due to their small size, they are expected to have better solubility in organic polymer or inorganic sol-gel host materials and to cause much less scattering, which should result in higher efficiency of the scintillator. Due to three-dimensional confinement and much better overlap of electron and hole wave functions, optical transitions should be much faster than bulk scintillators, which should eliminate the major problem of relatively slow response of scintillator detectors.

 
Tagsnanoparticles
 
Posted DateJan 14, 2011 11:50 AM

Researcher

Name
Krishnaprasad Sankar
Nathan Withers
Marek Osinski
Gennady Smolyakov
Brian Akins

Manager

Name
Briana Wobbe

Background

Scintillators are the most widely used detectors for gamma-ray spectroscopy. Current scintillator materials have numerous limitations. The need for more robust, efficient, higher speed scintillators exists, whether the application is gamma and X-ray counting, electron microscopy, electron and X-ray imaging screens, and tomography systems or high-energy physics. Over the last decade, the quest for an ideal scintillator has produced a large number of new materials with remarkable properties. Among those, rare-earth halides have produced the highest light outputs combined with speeds much faster than traditional scintillators. However, practically all of that effort focused on investigating single crystal materials. In contrast to wide exploitation of quantum confinement effects in optoelectronic and electronic devices, the physics and technology of inorganic scintillators is still limited to bulk materials.

Technology Description

This novel nanocrystal scintillator technology offers significantly improved performance applicable to range of industries. Colloidal nanocrystals have attracted tremendous interest over the last few years for a wide range of applications. So far, their potential has largely eluded the nuclear detection community. Compared to currently used scintillating particles of the micrometer size, nanocrystals offer the prospect of significantly improved performance. Due to their small size, they are expected to have better solubility in organic polymer or inorganic sol-gel host materials and to cause much less scattering, which should result in higher efficiency of the scintillator. Due to three-dimensional confinement and much better overlap of electron and hole wave functions, optical transitions should be much faster than bulk scintillators, which should eliminate the major problem of relatively slow response of scintillator detectors.

Advantages/Applications

  • High efficiency, better Solubility
  • Less scattering
  • High speed optical transitions and high energy resolution
  • Shortened decay time 
  • Room temperature operation 
  • Rugged, scalable, low cost

Applications

  • Positron Emission Tomography
  • Biomedical applications
  • Nuclear radiation detection
  • High energy physics
  • Spectroscopy

INQUIRES

STC has filed intellectual property on this exciting new technology and is currently exploring commercialization options. If you are interested in information about this or other technologies, please contact Arlene Mirabal at amirabal@stc.unm.edu or 505-272-7886.

Files

File Name Description
9,644,141 Issued Patent None Download
8,431,041 Issued Patent None Download

Intellectual Property

Patent Number Issue Date Type Country of Filing
9,644,141 May 9, 2017 Divisional United States
8,431,041 None Utility United States